Uniface uses Authenticode

Uniface’s use of Authenticode

In this blog post I discuss how Uniface uses Authenticode for signing Uniface executables on the Windows platform. A word on the merits of signing your executables. Code signing is nothing more than taking an executable and calculating a checksum, attaching that checksum in a cryptographically secure way to the executable. This way any customer can be assured of the integrity of the code they download from Uniface’s download server: it has not been tampered with nor was it altered while in transit. The use of a public-private key certificate from a reputable vendor adds the advantage that you can rest assured the code you downloaded really originated from Uniface.

Designing code signing requires you to take a step back revisiting your existing processes to identify potential issues. Any statements on the integrity of the code can only be satisfied if you manage your code signing keys in a defined way. We have a defined process of managing where keys reside, who has access to them and what people having access can do. Keys reside in a physically secured location, with access being controlled and limited to a small group of people in the company. Only these people can get their hands on the Uniface code signing keys for a limited set of defined purposes. Strict logging is in place so that key usage can be reviewed from audit logs.

The Uniface build factory consists of machines, that take source code from a version control system and run the build scripts to produce signed executables. The code signing is run directly from our makefiles. We use a set of ‘internal’ certificates when building Uniface. Machines that are part of the Uniface build factory have access to the ‘internal’ certificate and physical access to the build machine is limited. Only Windows executables that were produced in an official build can thus be signed using this ‘internal’ certificate. The certificate is only valid within the Uniface development lab. Outside the Uniface development lab a machine with Windows installed would lack the Uniface development lab ‘root’ certificate, which is needed to build a trust chain required to validate executables signed with the ‘internal’ certificate. Once we package a Uniface q-patch, patch, service pack or distribution, we also sign these deliverables. This effectively seals the package and protects its contents from unauthorized modifications.

We also timestamp all files, which means all signed files also carry an official counter signature with a timestamp. Should there be an irregularity, forcing us to withdraw our software, we can do this by revoking our certificate. This comes in two flavours: Either we fully revoke a certificate, or we revoke the certificate from a certain cut off timestamp. When the certificate is fully revoked, all files signed with this certificate become invalid and hence cannot be trusted anymore. If the exact moment in time when the irregularity occurred is known, we can revoke the certificate from this moment in time. This results in all files signed after this moment to become invalid. Files signed before this moment in time remain valid.

When we decide that a package is ready for shipping to our customers, we go through a process of re-signing such a package with our ‘external’ certificate.  This is done as part of the publication process. What we do is check every file in the package to see if it was signed using the Uniface ‘internal’ certificate. If a file was signed with the ‘internal’ certificate, it is resigned using our ‘external’ certificate. This ‘external’ certificate was obtained from a reputable vendor and the public key of the root certificate from that vendor is present in every Windows distribution. Hence using public-private key encryption, your Windows distribution can check that files that we have signed in our Uniface distribution have not been modified since we signed them and that the software is actually from us. So the next time you install Uniface, you can be sure the software is fine.

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