Tag Archives: innovation

European Women in Technology: An Event Recap

European Women in Technology 2017 – an event with attendees from every corner of the continent, was held in November in Amsterdam, and so it was a great opportunity for women working in Uniface to be a part of the event. It was an excellent platform to enable the tech sector to connect, learn about what is going on around the industry and to be inspired by the many women achieving fulfilling and interesting careers in technology. 

Uniface Women in IT
The group of attendees from Uniface
In this blog, we take 3 perspectives from those who attended. First up, Jyoti Singh, Software Developer:

The two day conference consisted of multiple parallel sessions running: inspirational keynotes, personal and career development workshops, technical classes, and networking opportunities; in short it contained all you need to progress and flourish in the tech sector.

As a whole, the event was significant from following different perspectives:

  • Inspirational and Motivational – It was an incredible experience to hear and learn from successful people in tech about championing women, the importance of female role models, accelerating career, getting into the boardroom etc. Some very interesting talks were about how to build confidence, use the right body language and market yourself to maximize your potential. It was also very encouraging to see how many women are leading in their career along with taking charge of their Life-Work Balance and succeeding in ever-Changing Technology World. It was a perfect learning for a reflection on your own career and where you are heading. 
  • Be Tech-savvy – Few sessions were targeted on latest trends and emerging technology, some are listed below :
    • Big data – being one of the hottest buzzwords across industry, but despite the hype there are challenges of distributed data storage and how to store and process big data are not yet fully understood. There were some good analysis in the session about how to approach these challenges by dispelling some myths, pointing out the pros and cons of various solutions available on the market and giving some tips on building reliable data pipelines.
    • Augmented Reality (AR) – Explaining how to build with AR using tools such as- ARCore and ARKit and find out the potential of AR for innovation in marketing and in product. 
    • Build Chatbots – with Amazon Lex – Amazon Lex is an AWS service for building conversational interfaces for applications using voice and text. The session was explaining that with Amazon Lex, you can build sophisticated, natural language chatbots into your applications to create new user experiences. 
    • Browser Peer to Peer Connections – How to create a server-less Realtime multiplayer game using peer to peer connections in the browser, making use of the WebRTC and dart technology.
    • Transforming the World with Artificial Intelligence (AI) – the hottest topic in technology – AI is not scary and that it can even be the exact opposite. The session explained that how AI is already helping people to do amazing things. How AI is can be used in our daily lives. Example: intelligent machines, self driving cars, smart camera’s, your own digital personal assistant, ways to discover new forms of medical treatment & much more! 
    • IoT and the Cloud – how to leverage Amazon Web Services (AWS) to build a real connected product which includes securely ingesting and sending data to the cloud and enabling device-device communication.
  • Networking – Last but very important, it was a great opportunity to meet like minded people and build the connections. 

The entire event was truly inspiring and thought provoking, and here I would like to end writing with my favourite quote from the sessions:

Uniface Women in IT

Next is Krissie Towikromo, Marketing Analyst:

In my whole career in the IT industry this was the first time that I attended the European Women in Technology Conference 2017.  I went to this event with no baggage and no expectations.  I wondered: “why is there a need for such a big event for Women in IT?”  I was overwhelmed by the passionate, positive and uplifting stories from the speakers.  We heard great stories from IBM, Microsoft and Adidas, among others.

Uniface Women in IT

During the inspiring sessions women explained the path they followed to get where they are today. The workshops were fun as some of the sessions were interactive and attendees could really participate in them.  You could visit one of the 31 companies on the exhibition floor who were there to show off their solutions and recruit talented women.

The lack of woman in tech does exist in 2017, and talking to all these talented women made me again realize we are far from ‘there’ yet.

Finally, from Christy Hillebrink, Marketing Director:

In one way it’s a pity that such an event exists—highlighting the shortage of female talent in the field of IT. However, the same can be said for other industries as well. Teaching for example is an area where the number of women far outweigh the number of men. So while it feels strange to have a specific event on this topic, on the other hand, it’s great that the lack of women in IT functions is being put on the radar and being talked about. That can only lead to more awareness and action from women, men and companies alike.

The focus of the event was around diversity and inclusion—and how companies that operate with these foundations can find more success than if they aren’t actively working in these areas. For me personally, there were several takeaways, thoughts and inspiration that I would like to share (in completely random order):

  • School curriculum and the promotion of IT topics in education is severely limited and outdated. This hurts everyone.
  • Be a “learn it all” vs a “know it all” to empower others and advance in your own career.
  • IBM prediction: medical labs “on a chip” will trace disease and predict our health. Cool!
  • Diversity is more than gender and race, and building teams based on which talents individuals can bring to the table is an art form.
  • Tech tracks being led by women engineers (everything from AI to blockchain to machine learning and everything in between) underlined that embracing IT is an opportunity for everyone.

Uniface Women in IT

It was very unique to attend an IT event with so many women. While there is not a quick fix, or even a concrete solution for having more women in IT, events like this help create a step in the right direction.

 

Innovation doesn’t always have to be a revolution

On October 19th I will be presenting at QUBE’s inspiration session. I would like to invite you to join the virtual event. For more information and to register visit: http://qube.cc/inspiration/

I would expect that any business could innovate incrementally in the way I’ve just been describing in my blog series, and many would find it vital to do so. Yet organizations can easily find themselves stuck when it comes to innovation. They don’t always realize how much they can gain right now from moving forward, or how much they have to lose should others overtake them.

For many businesses, when it comes to IT, the type of innovation to focus on could be improving user experience, making them more efficient, by creatively using and connecting what is already there. This in turn can contribute to a virtuous circle of growing business agility and innovation. By becoming more agile about the way they innovate with technology, companies can become more responsive, freeing themselves up for business innovation.

Mobile is one of the most important ways to unlock innovation. The first step of moving existing capabilities to mobile isn’t necessarily very innovative; however, it can lead to many innovative possibilities.

Could moving some functionality to mobile unlock innovation and hence agility for your business? Is there some other evolutionary step you could take that would do the same?

This series is based on the paper: Agility and Innovation in Application and Mobile Development.

You can download the paper here.

Mobile technology to power evolutionary innovation 

In this blog series I’ve covered how innovation can be evolutionary, but what does this look like in the real world?

Mobile technology is a great example of the power of evolutionary innovation, and is proving to be a major way of doing things better. Although mobile apps may have been just a fun distraction until relatively recently, companies increasingly see them as a way of unlocking their enterprise. In some environments, such as academia, users have already come to expect the applications they use to be accessible via mobile devices – and consumerization means this is increasingly the case across the board. What’s more, provision of mobile support often needs to happen fast.

Mobile evolutionary innovation 

Mobile lends itself to evolutionary approaches

You can add a lot of value by simply delivering existing applications’ business functionality via a mobile device, especially given they are typically always on and at hand 24×7. Porting key business tasks to mobile is a prime example of evolutionary innovation, especially as putting functionality on a mobile device can unlock many more innovative ideas. These could be as simple as capturing expenses on the fly, putting an end to lost receipts and time-consuming monthly admin.

Ideas could also be more ambitious. For example, a retailer could use location data to avoid missed deliveries and present alternative drop-off locations should the customer be away from home. Today, we already see notifications being heavily used to maximize the efficiency of deliveries.

With the right development platform, you can do this without much additional overhead. The team can focus on building good, responsive applications that can be deployed across platforms, whether desktop, web or mobile.

It is worth noting that for mobile apps, you don’t have to deliver the whole enterprise solution, just key processes that are relevant to the mobile platform. For example, in an HR application you can save a lot of time and money by putting holiday or expenses approvals on a manager’s phone. This is far more efficient than checking emails and possibly forgetting to act, as they can do the job with one or two touches in response to a notification.

Mobile promotes innovation

What we’ve just described can be truly innovative and evolutionary because you go back to basics. You start by thinking about what’s going on in a manager’s day and what they need to work smarter. You then enable that vision one bite at a time, reusing functionality you already have.

As well as reusing your existing solutions on mobile, you can also innovate by combining them with other technology. For example, a mobile device can continually gather information about location and other aspects of the user’s situation, presenting the right options when most appropriate. You can take advantage of all this real-time information to make your applications better. For example:

A salesperson could be alerted when they are in the neighborhood of a new lead.

While a shop assistant is talking to a customer, the assistant’s augmented reality glasses could feed live facts about products they’re looking at.

A building automation app could use geolocation information to manage lighting, heating and security as a person navigates the location.

A choice of approaches

Mobile innovation can pay big dividends. How evolutionary it is depends partly on the approach you adopt. Possible approaches range from native device development through to mobile web sites. Each has its pros and cons. By taking a pragmatic view, it is possible to combine the best aspects of different approaches.

A hybrid approach combines native and mobile web development, arguably giving you the best of both worlds. It yields opportunities to reuse much of your current functionality and team skills, while also taking advantage of device features. This opens up many innovative ways to improve user experience and efficiency when using the business application.

This series is based on the paper: Agility and Innovation in Application and Mobile Development.

You can download the paper here.

3-Step approach to evolutionary innovation

In my last blog post, I explored why everyone isn’t innovating if it’s so important. I surmised that innovation can be evolutionary as well as revolutionary. In this scenario, I would like to offer 3 steps to approach evolutionary innovation.

How is it possible to have your cake and eat it – to keep up with your urgent tasks while moving forward at the same time? Various solutions have been put forward, such as the idea of bimodal IT.

From what I’ve experienced, a good, pragmatic approach is to follow what is sometimes called “evolutionary innovation”. By building incrementally on what you have, it’s often possible to push forward with innovation without putting everything else on hold or disrupting business-as-usual.

Let’s look at how to approach evolutionary innovation under three headings:

  1. Build on what you have
  2. Make the most of the available ideas
  3. Be ready to fail

Uniface Innovation

  1. Build on what you have 

An idea doesn’t have to be brand new to be innovative. It’s often about doing the same thing better. Think about mobile phones. An initial step was going from wired to cordless. Since then, we have seen a lot of evolutionary steps, bringing us to the smartphones we use today. There have of course been some revolutionary jumps; however, for the most part, the innovation has been evolutionary.

Rather than await a flash of inspiration and light-bulb “eureka moment” – going from nothing to revolution – we can innovate by listening to people’s challenges and turning these into creative new ideas.

Those ideas can often be implemented with what you already have. In the case of IT innovation, it’s possible to work with solutions that take care of encapsulating technical complexity. That way, you can quickly utilize your existing business assets, getting more out them, with zero (or minimal) rework effort. For example, you may be able to move a legacy application to the web without rewriting core business code. This means you have the time and resources to go on continuously improving your solutions to keep pace with business, consumer and technological change.

  1. Make the most of the available ideas 

It’s important to listen to what other people are thinking – everyone is innovating. The best ideas of all will often come from your own workforce, so it is important to find ways to develop this important resource. With the consumerization of IT and the 24×7 access available to users, particularly through smart devices, the era of apps, bots and assistants sparks many ideas and demands. Combined with the many continually improving features available on these devices, the scope to innovate is immense.

Organizations should try to provide employees with “play time”. Children learn and very rapidly develop through playing; the adult version of this is called R&D. Unfortunately, as we mature, the amount of play appears to decline. Organizations should aim for a range of individual and group activities such as personal experimentation time and team hackathons. It’s important to include individual activities as well as group ones because not all ideas come to the surface in the context of a group, especially if a few people are particularly dominant. As simple as this last statement may seem, it is often overlooked.

The trick is to strike the right balance between business tasks, prescribed learning, and play time. When you hit the sweet spot, you may be surprised how many ideas you have at your disposal – who knows, you may even have enough to spin off additional solution offerings or even new business entities.

  1. Be ready to fail 

With any form of innovation, you must be prepared for some of your ideas not to work. Eddie Obeng’s TED talk on Smart Failure for a Fast-Changing World memorably captures why this is so important. We don’t experiment enough, and although companies pay lip service to the idea that it’s OK to fail, they often find it hard to follow through.

This is one of the biggest blockers to innovation, and we need to overcome it. We have to find ways to experiment with new ideas, some of which will fail. We must ensure that businesses of all sizes fully understand and account for this requirement. If we take the phrase “Be ready to fail” and replace the word fail with experiment, test, try, learn, play, develop, grow, evolve or many similar words, the emotional response is very different – however, the end goal remains the same. Whatever word we choose, the process of innovation is normally iterative. It is important to understand this principle and not give up at the first hurdle.

This series is based on the paper: Agility and Innovation in Application and Mobile Development. You can download the paper here.

If innovation is so important, why isn’t everyone doing it? 

So why isn’t everyone innovating? Sometimes people simply get too comfortable with the status quo to try something new. Think how many users were reluctant to move from Windows 7, which admittedly let them do their job fine, to Windows 8, which some considered less perfect. But, once they were through the Windows 7/8 mourning curve, it was easy to change to Windows 10, with very quick emotional acceptance and significant benefits.

Another major reason for not innovating is that people have more pressing things to do, and this is no doubt true. Throughout life, we often hear phrases like: “I’m too busy,” “I’ve got higher priorities,” and “We have to clear the backlog.” Within the IT function, some technical teams are big enough only to keep up with day-to-day maintenance, leaving no scope to craft new solutions or modernize legacy applications. Large organizations may also find they spend too much time and resources “keeping the lights on,” with little left for innovation.

Innovation

A Catch 22 situation then arises, because by not moving forward, it becomes harder to deliver. This can lead to a failure to give the organization the business agility it needs.

Another reason for failure to innovate at the right pace, is that for many organizations, it’s difficult to make innovation work. As discussed in a recent article by Anderee Berengian, the innovation lab model has often failed. I’m going to elaborate on Berengian’s conclusion that “real innovation comes from outside your company,” as although that may be true for some, for the rest of us there is an alternative.

In my first blog post I addressed the question: What comes first—innovation or agility? In my next post I will look at 3 approaches to innovation for organizations.

This series is based on the paper: Agility and Innovation in Application and Mobile Development.  

You can download the paper here.