Uniface Security

Blog by Jason Huggins

UNIFACE SECURITY  

The latest releases of Uniface 9 and 10 mark a significant milestone in the enhancement of security, both under the covers along with new functionality to secure applications.

I believe that in practice all organizations need to protect aspects of business confidentially, competitive edge, adhere to applicable privacy regulations and prevent data theft/manipulation. Protecting data is paramount for practically everyone. It can feel like the wild west at times, with attacks coming from all directions, for example an employee, a contractor/visitor, a cyber-criminal, malware/ransomware, accidental hackers, curious observers… the list goes on! Whether the data breach is internal, external, malicious or accidental, the risk should be understood, assessed and addressed.

The statistics of count, size and cost to a victim show that global data breaches have been on a continual increase each year. The current average cost of breaches is in the millions of dollars range, with total costs per year globally in the billions. Breach sizes have ranged from tens of millions of confidential records up to many billions of lines of data.

Predictions suggest that a clear majority of enterprise traffic will be encrypted throughout 2019. It is important for Uniface to support this, whilst making it an easy as part of the development and deployment platform to utilize.

What is the threat?

There are many threats to data security for which network security exposes a key flaw. There is an inherent weakness in the standard TCP/IP network model and IPv4 because none of the layers include security features as such. The protocols ensure very reliable transmission of data however do not fully ensure data integrity or confidentially.  It is extremely easy to sniff and tamper with the data in real time.

But wait, what about IPv6 you may ask? Well IPsec, a security protocol, is built into the IPv6 standard however it is not mandatory. The official launch of IPv6 was in 2012 however IPv4 is still the dominant protocol covering around 75% of deployments. The rate of adoption appears to be slowing however this does not in any way mean that IPv6 will not become the dominant standard, it may just take a little longer than expected. IPSec within IPv6 will not necessarily become the drop-in solution to the security hole. It is still valid to apply alternative or additional mechanisms to secure the transmitted data. The Uniface implementation means that the application can with ease, reliably ensure encryption is applied whatever the underlying IPv’N’ network infrastructure implementation and protocol support may be.

What’s new in network security?

Uniface now has a cryptography layer added to its network stack. The implementation is a TLS layer built on top of the standard TCP driver. The TCP driver itself has been refactored yielding several improvements. The new TLS driver utilises OpenSSL libraries. OpenSSL, often referred to as the

‘Swiss Army Knife’ of cryptography, is well maintained/supported, has excellent platform coverage and is backed by major organizations. It implements both Pre-shared key (PSK) and Asymmetric Certificate/Key pair verification, the later providing greater levels of security. The cryptography methods supported, called ciphers, are those of OpenSSL, however by default Uniface will only list the stronger ciphers.

The new driver encrypts the network traffic, including IPv6, between Uniface processes encompassing both shared and exclusive servers. A key feature supported by the TLS driver is ‘Peer Name Verification’, which helps mitigate compromises such as ‘Man in the Middle’ attacks.

Configuration is very straight forward matching the typical driver approach, with familiar mnemonics such as ‘tls:’ & ‘USYS$TLS_PARAMS’. The configuration and various possibilities are well documented in the help.

Considerations

Security is a shared responsibility spanning development and operations. Being more of configuration exercise, developers will see little change. The extra processing needed to encrypt/decrypt may have an influence e.g. transaction size and client vs server processing could become a consideration. Note: Uniface benchmarks match the published OpenSSL results.

Operations should understand security, TLS and encryption, ensuring to pick ciphers that adhere to internal policies whilst maximising performance. The ‘pathscrambler’ is essential and must be used to safeguard the TLS configuration settings.

The TLS driver is simple to use and should be considered an essential priority for most.

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