Tag Archives: web

HTML5, Javascript and CSS3 training videos for Uniface developers on Uniface.info

The Web capabilities of Uniface have increased year over year. At the moment there are at least six different architectures to integrate Web technology in Uniface or build full Web applications in Uniface.  The HTML5 Widget, Uniface Anywhere and DSPs are obvious examples. In an upcoming blog post, I will go into more detail comparing all options.

Developing modern enterprise applications also requires more Web knowledge for Uniface Developers.

To facilitate this we made a special series of training videos on Web topics for Uniface developers. This series is available on Uniface.info and consists of Introduction and Advanced videos on HTML5, Javascript and CSS3.

The Introduction videos assume zero existing knowledge of the technology. The Advanced Topics can be played in any order and assume the Introduction as pre-requisite. Some videos come with demo material which is available as a download.

To make it easy, I’ve listed all the available videos:

HTML:

Hello World:  http://unifaceinfo.com/html-hello-world/

This session is an introduction to the Hyper Text Markup Language (HTML). We will be creating our first website and use a couple of HTML elements to display some simple text and an image.

Introduction: http://unifaceinfo.com/html5-introduction/

This session discusses the basics of HTML5. It introduces a lot of new HTML elements to give a clear structure to your website. Why are semantics are important?

Canvas: http://unifaceinfo.com/html5-canvas/

This session discusses the HTML5 canvas. We’ll create a simple Uniface graphic by ourselves, and have a look at some more complex examples.

SVG & Multimedia: http://unifaceinfo.com/html5-svg-multimedia/

This session is all about the HTML5 SVG, audio and video elements. We’ll discuss the differences between a Canvas and SVG, and see how we can incorporate a video and mp3 without using Flash or third party libraries.

Geolocation & Storage: http://unifaceinfo.com/html5-geolocation-storage/

This session is about using getCurrentPosition() to obtain the GPS coordinates of the user. Afterwards we’ll store this information in the localStorage object so it is remembered.

Javascript:

Introduction 1: http://unifaceinfo.com/javascript-introduction/

This session is an introduction to JavaScript. Its main characteristics will be discussed, and we will be looking at an example. Moreover we will have a quick glance at its connection with HTML.

Introduction 2: http://unifaceinfo.com/javascript-introduction-ii/

This session is part II of the introduction JavaScript session. We will be looking at some more useful functions, types, objects and arrays.

D3: http://unifaceinfo.com/javascript-d3/

This is a short session about D3. We’ll discuss some use cases and see how it works through the use of some examples. 

JSON: http://unifaceinfo.com/javascript-json/

This is a short session about JSON. We’ll quickly see what it is, how it works, and how you can actually use it.

Advanced Javascript: http://unifaceinfo.com/javascript-advanced/

This is an in-depth session about JavaScript. We’ll go through different ways of using events, and see how the only option of executing things in parallel in Javascript is using callbacks.

 

CSS3:

Introduction: http://unifaceinfo.com/css-introduction/

In this session we’ll explore the new possibilities of CSS3. It provides a lot of new features that make the life of the developer and designer a lot easier.

Advanced CSS3: http://unifaceinfo.com/css3-advanced/

This is a follow-up of the CSS3 – Introduction session. Transformations allow you to modify the appearance of any HTML to your liking. Be it rotated, translated or skewed. Transformations and animations make HTML elements move around and respond to events.

If you have a question about any of the videos just open a topic on the forum.

 

Uniface Training Modules offer more Flexibility

With the development of faster and even better Uniface software there was clearly a need for better and more flexible and efficient Uniface education and training. With the release of Uniface 9.7 the training materials were revisited, redesigned and partly redeveloped. The input from many Uniface consultants during and after the train-the-trainer session, conducted in October last year, seemed invaluable.

The training materials have been developed in a more modular way to even more meet the needs of our customers and enable a more flexible delivery. Three tracks have been defined. The courses can be delivered as classroom training or over Web, using the CloudShare® platform.

This blog briefly describes the available tracks and modules for these trainings.

After having successfully completed the two days Uniface Essentials, there are three options. Each option takes three days to be completed.

Uniface Training Modules

  • The Uniface Essentials training focusses on the model-driven and component-based development and will equip students, new with Uniface, with the necessary basic skills to develop software applications with Uniface. Students will be prepared for the next module. The Uniface Essentials module is a prerequisite for the Uniface Mobile, Uniface Web, and Uniface Client Server training.
  • With Uniface Mobile students will learn to develop responsive applications that can be deployed on mobile devices and tablet computers. Attention will be paid to some supportive frameworks for building responsive applications.
  • In the Uniface Web development class students are taught how to develop Uniface applications by building Dynamic Server Pages for the Web. All aspects of stateless software development are covered in this course. Some attention will be given to HTML5, and CSS3.
  • Uniface Windows Client means building application for the Windows platform.

For each module students are encouraged to make a number of exercises to become more acquainted with the specific topics covered in the training modules. There will be enough time to ask questions, for discussion, and the exchange of ideas and information to optimize the learning process.

Besides these trainings, where students will learn the basic skills, more advanced topics and techniques can be covered in custom made trainings. These customized training are delivered on customer demands only, and can be geared toward specific customer situations.

For questions, comments or remarks about Uniface training please contact uniface.training@uniface.com, or download this fact sheet with more information.

Uniface 9.7 WEB: When business rules

Guest contributor Dino Seelig (Uniface Business Partner) talks about his first impressions of Uniface 9.7

Last week I visited the Uniface Lab. The goal: getting informed about connecting WEB apps using Uniface DSP’s.

Building an app, using an off the shelf frame-work, integrating the power of Uniface service was for me a wish for many many years.

Communicating from a WEB app with a Uniface server using a HTTP request was not that hard, but something simple like: “leaving this field validate of the value of this field is a valid key” was still a lot of work. Setup an event listener, pickup the event fired, post an request over HTTP, handle the response, and so on.

With the introduction of Uniface 9.7 the javascript library Uniface.js simplifies the number of actions. The Uniface 9.7 way: create using javascript a new instance of your Uniface component, activate your operation using params and get your result makes life easy. The power available in Uniface Client/Server becomes now a part the web environment. Not bad. Implementing requirements like “can you calculate the sum? can you switch value when? can you hide show when?” are not time consuming anymore.

Is that all? No there is more. The lab switched from promise driven to quality driven delivery. In the past, the timebox (4 months) was used for to deliver the communicated promises. However the time box is not changed. The vision is. They will spend the time needed to make it excellent. That for me is the best promise to move to 9.7. Uniface is back on track simplifying complex things and shorten the time to delivery again.

Dino Seelig

Dino Seelig
Dino Seelig

TCCO.NL BV

Polymer: Getting a closer look

Last week, a few of us from the mobile scrum team attended the first ever Polymer summit organized by Google. Amsterdam was chosen as the perfect location for the international conference, since it is has an “incredibly strong developer community in Europe”. 

20150915_090354

The event is fully devoted to Polymer: a new web library fully developed by Google and widely supported by the WebKit-based browsers (i.e. Chrome, Opera) and Microsoft Edge. With Polymer, users can create composable and modularized web applications that make use of a new web standard, called web components. Web Components are currently being produced by Google engineers as a W3C standard. They are built on four basic foundations: (1) native client-side templating; (2) shadow DOM scoping and composition; (3) custom elements to create your own HTML DOM elements; and (4) HTML imports to load web components.

20150915_172332

Polymer web components architecture is already used by many companies and users. One user was quoted at the event: “We no longer build applications. We have and are enriching, a module market sourced from industry and the ING global community. Modules are assembled into applications as the business requires,” ING – one of the first users of web components – quoted in one of the presentations.

20150914_180650

I also speak on behalf of my colleagues who also attended, when I say it was an interesting and well organized event full of useful information and examples of what is coming our way regarding web and mobile development. In case you are interested, the whole event was recorded and can be viewed on their YouTube page.

 

When thinking Desktop “first” still matters (Part 2)

By Clive Howard, Principal AnalystCreative Intellect Consulting

Read Part 1 Here

Great experiences are not just for mobile

In an era of high user expectation and the demand for great user engagement, Application User Interface (UI) design has never been so important. We’ve heard this message before of course, when the virtues of Web 2.0 and Rich Internet Application were espoused in the mid 2000’s and browser based applications along with the proliferation of smartphones, tablets and mobile apps cemented that reality.  Many organisations have now caught up and are starting to realise that users demand more usable experiences and providing them can have productivity benefits. The results can often be seen on a business’s bottom line or through competitive advantage. I worked on a call centre application where improvements to the User Experience (UX) dramatically reduced call times and improved the quality of data collected. This led to efficiency within the call centre and improved outcomes for both the business and the customer. Costs were reduced and customer satisfaction rose.

In a desktop first world designers will still need to provide users with great UX. At the same time they need to appreciate the potential for different end user form factors. Application interfaces will need to adapt to alternate screen sizes. The modern desktop could be a traditional 20 inch monitor or a 10 inch touch screen. Where the desktop application spawns mobile apps they will need to have consistency with the desktop experience. A user should be able to move from desktop to tablet to mobile very easily because the app experience is familiar to them. This is best achieved if the original design considers the possibility of mobile from the beginning.

Plan for a “multi endpoint first” future

For all of those development professionals out there who have spent their careers building desktop applications their future should be secure. But they will need to adapt their skills, thinking,  tools and possibly their processes to a new world in which mobile may not always be first but will be relevant. Many desktop applications will remain installs but many others will be delivered via a web browser. Equally for the IT decision makers they need to think about investments that are not just about mobile. It is very easy in the current climate to think that the future is mobile and therefore investing in mobile only platforms is the way to go.

Instead they need to consider that the desktop is going to be around for a while and they need to invest in platforms, tools and skills that will support a broad portfolio of applications. Essentially this comes down to being efficient with the code base. Not replicating code should always be a core aim. Creating code that can be tested at all levels of the stack should be a further key ambition; making the functions of that code base available through services to multiple end points should be another. With a services based architecture, the application may be spread across both the company data centre and public cloud environments.

Where development moves to being Agile, development will need to work with Operations in order to speed application changes into production. This will most likely mean embracing a DevOps culture, processes and tools. The modern desktop app will require more regular updates than the old fashioned quarterly release.

There will certainly be many situations where a mobile first approach will make sense in future. Studies show that people are accessing the internet more from mobile than desktop and so for websites mobile first will probably be a good idea in the majority of cases. However, the future will be a combination of mobile, tablet and desktop experiences. Developers and organisations will therefore need to consider each application and in some cases it will make sense to go desktop first.