Tag Archives: Training

Attending a cloud infrastructure training – A truly AWSome Day in Amsterdam

Last week I attended, along with a few other Uniface software engineers, the AWSome Day Amsterdam event, organized by Amazon Web Services (AWS) – the world’s largest provider of cloud infrastructure services (IaaS). The event was a one-day training in Amsterdam delivered by AWS technical instructors. More than 300 (maybe even 400) people attended the event. It was very crowded, but a very well-organized event.

From Uniface, a few people from the cloud, mobile and security teams attended the event, each with their own project in mind.

The interactive training provided us with a lot of information about cloud deployment, security and usage for the web and mobile environments. The focus was on AWS as a provider of cloud infrastructure services. In a nutshell, technical instructors elaborated on the following:

AWS infrastructure with information about the three main services they offer:

  1. Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3) to store objects up to 5 terabyte in multiple buckets. This service includes advanced lifecycle management tools for your files.
  2. Amazon Elastic Cloud Compute (EC2) which offers virtual servers as you need. EC2 has advanced security and networking options and tools to manage storage. Also very interesting, you can write your own algorithm to scale up or down to handle changes in requirements or spikes in popularity, to reduce costs and improve your efficiency.
  3. Amazon Elastic Block Store (EBS) which provides persistent block-level storage volumes that you can attach to a single EC2 instance. Interesting is that EBS volumes persist independently from running life of an EC2 instance. You can use EBS volumes as primary storage for especially data that requires frequent updates and for throughput-intensive applications that perform continuous disk scans. EBS is flexible, in the sense that you can easily grow volumes.

 AWS Event

During the event we discussed extensively the security risks, identity management and access functionalities. But also the usage of different databases (SQL vs NoSQL) together with the cloud services. Interesting topics discussed at the event were concepts such as Auto scaling of EC2 instances, Load Balancing, and management tools such as CloudWatch and AWS Trusted Advisor, which seems to be very useful to track security and costs issues.

Uniface Attending AWS Event

In general, the event has broadened my view on cloud deployment using AWS, but also using other cloud infrastructure services as the same concepts can be applied to other cloud providers. 

It was truly an AWSome Day in Amsterdam!

Uniface Training Modules offer more Flexibility

With the development of faster and even better Uniface software there was clearly a need for better and more flexible and efficient Uniface education and training. With the release of Uniface 9.7 the training materials were revisited, redesigned and partly redeveloped. The input from many Uniface consultants during and after the train-the-trainer session, conducted in October last year, seemed invaluable.

The training materials have been developed in a more modular way to even more meet the needs of our customers and enable a more flexible delivery. Three tracks have been defined. The courses can be delivered as classroom training or over Web, using the CloudShare® platform.

This blog briefly describes the available tracks and modules for these trainings.

After having successfully completed the two days Uniface Essentials, there are three options. Each option takes three days to be completed.

Uniface Training Modules

  • The Uniface Essentials training focusses on the model-driven and component-based development and will equip students, new with Uniface, with the necessary basic skills to develop software applications with Uniface. Students will be prepared for the next module. The Uniface Essentials module is a prerequisite for the Uniface Mobile, Uniface Web, and Uniface Client Server training.
  • With Uniface Mobile students will learn to develop responsive applications that can be deployed on mobile devices and tablet computers. Attention will be paid to some supportive frameworks for building responsive applications.
  • In the Uniface Web development class students are taught how to develop Uniface applications by building Dynamic Server Pages for the Web. All aspects of stateless software development are covered in this course. Some attention will be given to HTML5, and CSS3.
  • Uniface Windows Client means building application for the Windows platform.

For each module students are encouraged to make a number of exercises to become more acquainted with the specific topics covered in the training modules. There will be enough time to ask questions, for discussion, and the exchange of ideas and information to optimize the learning process.

Besides these trainings, where students will learn the basic skills, more advanced topics and techniques can be covered in custom made trainings. These customized training are delivered on customer demands only, and can be geared toward specific customer situations.

For questions, comments or remarks about Uniface training please contact uniface.training@uniface.com, or download this fact sheet with more information.

Uniface Lectures Webinar Series: Sharing Technical Information

Uniface Lectures Webinar Series

We are about to launch a new webinar series initiative to help share Uniface technical knowledge called the Uniface Lectures.

Once a month there will be an evening session held here at our office in Amsterdam on a particular topic.  Using the latest version of Uniface we will be showing functionality, tips and tricks with the goal of sharing technical knowledge.

Now obviously this is only useful for customers who are able to get here to attend, so we will also repeat the sessions as online webinars, and finally they will be recorded and posted on YouTube. Different Uniface technical experts will be delivering the webinars and we’ll be doing about one per month making sure to cover both East and West time zones.

At this time,  we have the following topics planned. 

  • February – Modernization
  • March – Deployment 
  • April – JavaScript Integration
  • May – Mobile 
  • June – Integration using REST 

We’ll probably take a break for the summer period, but we then intend to restart the sessions in the fall timeframe with new topics. 

We would be interested in ideas of topics to cover, please add suggestions and ideas below in the comments.  What would you like to see covered? What do you want to learn more about?

Further details, and how to register for the Lectures can be found here.

Uniface Lectures

Real Life Scrum: A Presentation to Technology Students in Amsterdam

On Tuesday December 1st, Uniface was invited to deliver a guest lecture at the Technical School in Amsterdam for the students who have ambition in the Technology area. From Uniface Berry Kuijer, JiaoJiao Xia and I were the representatives to share their knowledge, expertise and real-life experiences with the students.

The presentation started with an ‘Introduction of Uniface’ focusing on few key points, by Berry Kuijer:
-History and vision of Uniface
-Customers and the market span
-Business model
-Development and deployment
-A live Uniface application development demo

Next in line were Jiaojiao and I to give a presentation about “Scrum in Uniface lab.” We briefed the students about the software development methodology used for managing the product development in Uniface. First we explained how the agile-scrum methodology are being used in Uniface Lab, by maximizing the team’s ability to deliver quickly, to respond to emerging requirements and to adapt to evolving technologies and changes in market conditions.

Second part of the presentation was about showing the ‘bigger picture’ of scrum by giving a real life example and how to apply it in daily life. We gave an example of what started off as a simple story in the lab and then showed how it became more complex and larger because of additional requirements. We wanted the students to understand that in the “real world” of software development, you can’t always foresee everything in the beginning. With the example we gave—we realized more about the complexity of a feature and its impact on the existing software architecture while started working on the feature, and therefore how a particular requirement would than emerge bigger than it appeared before. There are of course many other examples of how things can change during the process of building software.

Uniface
Uniface Lecture Team

So we took them from defining the features (user stories) into the wish list (product backlog), proceeded by planning those into workable timeslots (sprints) while reviewing the progress on the daily scrums to present the finished result in the review or demo meeting. Concluding with the retrospective to reflect and learn how to improve the process by knowing what went well and what can be improved. This was emphasized while reviewing examples on how it worked in practice in our teams and with our product owners in Uniface. Finally, we told them that they could apply this methodology to their team assignments and their current studies or practices.

The presentation was well received by the students as the whole atmosphere was stimulated by interaction and interesting questions coming from the students. The concept of SCRUM was very clear and they could relate to our “real life” example when requirements change, get larger, etc. It was a great experience for us and we also believe that the students benefited from being exposed to the perspectives that the Uniface guest lecture team provided.

Re-inventing the Uniface customer events

Our Uniface customer event season has just started, and several of us have been busy preparing content which we will be delivering at various events around the world. We have decided to make some changes to the events which we (Uniface) run ourselves although we always make the content available to the various independent user groups such as Face to Face in the Netherlands and UnifaceBenutzerGruppe, or UBG in Germany

The thinking started last year (2014) at the US Event in Las Vegas, where we ran the ever popular ‘Speed Networking sessions’ which are a cross between round table discussions and speed dating. One of the topics was ‘The Future of the NAUUG’, chaired by Zulayka. (NAUUG being North American Uniface User Group). 

The feedback we got was interesting, and we’ve taken a lot of it onboard. The primary points being that there was a desire for the content to be more technical, and code, techniques and techie stuff is the most interesting. (We also see that technically oriented blog posts on Uniface.info are generally the most popular.)

Uniface
Uniface

The result is that this year, the user events that we are running are Developer Conferences, with a focus on the technical content. We’ve also been working hard on the technical content, which will cover a variety of topics, such as UX, integration, development techniques, etc and will include getting into the code, with the source code being made available for future reference, use and enhancement. The sessions are delivered by various members of the Uniface technical team, and it should add up to be a really compelling reason to attend the events. 

We have Developer Conferences already scheduled for the UK, France and the US which is always our biggest event over three days, and this week a few of us are in Japan, with one event in Tokyo and one in Osaka (both of which are sold out), and I’m sure we will have more events in 2016. The technical content is available to be used at the other customer events which we don’t run ourselves, for example some of the Uniface team are in Israel this week and we usually have events in Latin America and Australia, although we’ve not booked anything at this time.